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Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Award for the Advancement of Research in Pure Mathematics

This award is presented to the individual deemed to have made the most substantial contribution in research in the field of pure mathematics, and who is deemed to have the potential for future production of distinguished research in such field.

Award Details
This prize is awarded every four years for the most substantial Ph.D. thesis produced in the four year interval between awards.

The award is presented at the International Congress of Mathematicians when feasible, and during each of the following three years the grantee shall be required to present his or her current research to an academy or mathematical society during at least one meeting.  In 1993, the AMS Council "agreed that the Society will invite, on a quadrennial basis, the Committee to Select the Winner of the Blumenthal Prize to award its prize at an Annual Meeting of the Society and will invite the Grantee to deliver an Address to the meeting of the Society."

Next Award
2013

Most Recent Award: 2009
The 2009 recipient of the Blumenthal Award was Maryam Mirzakhani.

About this Award
The Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Trust for the Advancement of Mathematics was created for the purpose of assisting the Department of Mathematics of the University of Missouri at Columbia, where Leonard Blumenthal served as professor for many years. Its second purpose is to recognize distinguished achievements in the field of mathematics through the Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Award for the Advancement of Research in Pure Mathematics, which was originally funded from the Eleanor B. Blumenthal Trust (dated September 24, 1984) upon Mrs. Blumenthal’s death on July 12, 1987.  The Trust, which is administered by the Financial Management and Trust Services Division of Boone County National Bank in Columbia, Missouri, pays its net income to the recipient of the award each year for four years. The recipient is selected by a committee of five members, each of whom has made notable contributions to mathematics. 

See previous awards