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Math ImageryThe connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M.C. Escher represented infinity, Möbius bands, tessellations, deformations, reflections, Platonic solids, spirals, symmetry, and the hyperbolic plane in his works.

Mathematicians and artists continue to create stunning works in all media and to explore the visualization of mathematics--origami, computer-generated landscapes, tesselations, fractals, anamorphic art, and more.

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Home > 2009 Mathematical Art Exhibition

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"Sa'odat (Happiness)," by Nathan Voirol (2007)Hand-made ceramic tile, 15" diameter. "Islamic star pattern based on a tessellation of 18 and 12 pointed stars in a hexagonal repeat. My primary artistic interest is in designing repeatable patterns--I particularly enjoy creating geometric star and floral designs, which stem from my fascination with Islamic art." --- Nathan Voirol, CAD Drafter / Freelance Artist, Santa Barbara, CA
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Ulfah (Harmony)," by Nathan Voirol (2008)Silkscreen print on paper, 20" x 24". "Islamic star pattern based on a tessellation of a 54 pointed star surrounded by 9 and 18 pointed stars in a hexagonal repeat. My primary artistic interest is in designing repeatable patterns--I particularly enjoy creating geometric star and floral designs, which stem from my fascination with Islamic art." --- Nathan Voirol, CAD Drafter / Freelance Artist, Santa Barbara, CA
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"Flow 1," by Elizabeth Whiteley (2008)Laminated canvas and acrylic paint, 7.5" x 14" x 7.5". "'Flow 1' is created by intersecting two Golden Triangles (base angles of 72 degrees and vertex angle 36 degrees). The plane of each triangle is partially bisected and then curved to create an aesthetically pleasing form. One triangle is smooth; the other has a textured surface. The sculpture changes our perception of a static and planar geometric shape and makes for a dynamic visual experience. The curves move the eye around the form and suggest multiple points of view." --- Elizabeth Whiteley, Studio artist, Washington, DC
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"Flow 4," by Elizabeth Whiteley (2008)Museum board and acrylic paint, 7.5" x 13.5" x 10.5". "'Flow 4' is created by the close proximity of two Golden Triangles (base angles of 72 degrees and vertex angle 36 degrees). The plane of each triangle is curved in opposing directions to create an aesthetically pleasing form. The sculpture changes our perception of a static and planar geometric shape and makes for a dynamic visual experience. The curves move the eye around the form and suggest multiple points of view." --- Elizabeth Whiteley, Studio artist, Washington, DC
   
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