Publications Meetings The Profession Membership Programs Math Samplings Policy & Advocacy In the News About the AMS

 



Math ImageryThe connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M.C. Escher represented infinity, Möbius bands, tessellations, deformations, reflections, Platonic solids, spirals, symmetry, and the hyperbolic plane in his works.

Mathematicians and artists continue to create stunning works in all media and to explore the visualization of mathematics--origami, computer-generated landscapes, tesselations, fractals, anamorphic art, and more.

Jump to one of the galleries

Share this page

|



Share this

|

Explore the world of mathematics and art, share an e-postcard, and bookmark this page to see new featured works..

Home > 2013 Mathematical Art Exhibition

"540º," by Ayelet Lindenstrauss Larsen (Indiana University, Bloomington)

1" x 8" x 8", Cotton, silk, dissolvable muslin, 2003

This Möbius band is twisted three times, each time by 180 degrees, before its short sides are attached to each other. Topologically, it is the same as the usual Möbius band where the band is twisted only once before attaching the short sides to each other; it is just embedded in 3-space in a different way. The edge of a Möbius band consists of one long circle. If you follow the edge of this Möbius band, you will go through the colors of the rainbow, from red to purple, and then transition to red through red-purple and begin the cycle again. -- Ayelet Lindenstrauss Larsen

jmm13-jin~0.jpg jmm13-kepner~0.jpg jmm13-larsen~0.jpg jmm13-lee~0.jpg jmm13-lisar-sarhangi~0.jpg