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Math ImageryThe connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M.C. Escher represented infinity, Möbius bands, tessellations, deformations, reflections, Platonic solids, spirals, symmetry, and the hyperbolic plane in his works.

Mathematicians and artists continue to create stunning works in all media and to explore the visualization of mathematics--origami, computer-generated landscapes, tesselations, fractals, anamorphic art, and more.

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Home > 2010 Mathematical Art Exhibition
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"Elements," by Jeff Chyatte (Montgomery College and River Bend Studio at Water’s Edge, Washington DC)

Painted High Carbon Steel, Impala Black Granite, Height 18” , Width 16” , Depth 16”, 2009. Fusing math, art and aesthetics, Elements incorporates mathematically significant dimensions that add an intriguing subtlety to its construction. Euclid studied the Golden Ratio 1 to 1.618 (Greek letter Phi) for its many interesting properties as described in his manuscript Elements. Those proportions were used by great artists and architects throughout the Renaissance in the form of the Golden Rectangle. The three intersecting planes that comprise Element’s core are Golden Rectangles. Their intersection creates 20 equilateral triangles, drawn from their points - an Icosahedron. Further, these rectangles use dimensions from the Fibonacci Sequence providing for a variety of mathematical implications. --- Jeff Chyatte (Montgomery College and River Bend Studio at Water’s Edge, Washington DC)

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