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Pearls from a Lost City: The Lvov School of Mathematics
Roman Duda, University of Wrocław, Poland
Translated by Daniel Davies
cover
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History of Mathematics
2014; 231 pp; hardcover
Volume: 40
ISBN-10: 1-4704-1076-1
ISBN-13: 978-1-4704-1076-6
List Price: US$39
Member Price: US$31.20
Order Code: HMATH/40
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See also:

Stefan Banach: Remarkable Life, Brilliant Mathematics - Emilia Jakimowicz and Adam Miranowicz

The fame of the Polish school at Lvov rests with the diverse and fundamental contributions of Polish mathematicians working there during the interwar years. In particular, despite material hardship and without a notable mathematical tradition, the school made major contributions to what is now called functional analysis. The results and names of Banach, Kac, Kuratowski, Mazur, Nikodym, Orlicz, Schauder, Sierpiński, Steinhaus, and Ulam, among others, now appear in all the standard textbooks.

The vibrant joie de vivre and singular ambience of Lvov's once scintillating social scene are evocatively recaptured in personal recollections. The heyday of the famous Scottish Café--unquestionably the most mathematically productive cafeteria of all time--and its precious Scottish Book of highly influential problems are described in detail, revealing the special synergy of scholarship and camaraderie that permanently elevated Polish mathematics from utter obscurity to global prominence.

This chronicle of the Lvov school--its legacy and the tumultuous historical events which defined its lifespan--will appeal equally to mathematicians, historians, or general readers seeking a cultural and institutional overview of key aspects of twentieth-century Polish mathematics not described anywhere else in the extant English-language literature.

Readership

Undergraduate, graduate, and research mathematicians interested in the history of mathematics and the Polish history of sciences.

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