AMS Bookstore LOGO amslogo
Return to List

AMS TextbooksAMS Applications-related Books

Computational Complexity Theory
Edited by: Juris Hartmanis
SEARCH THIS BOOK:

Proceedings of Symposia in Applied Mathematics
1989; 128 pp; softcover
Volume: 38
Reprint/Revision History:
reprinted 1990
ISBN-10: 0-8218-0131-7
ISBN-13: 978-0-8218-0131-4
List Price: US$50
Member Price: US$40
Order Code: PSAPM/38
[Add Item]

Computational complexity theory is the study of the quantitative laws that govern computing. During the last 25 years, this field has grown into a rich mathematical theory. Currently one of the most active research areas in computer science, complexity theory is of considerable interest to mathematicians as well, since some of the key open problems in this field raise basic questions about the nature of mathematics. Many experts in complexity theory believe that, in coming decades, the strongest influence on the development of mathematics will come from the extended use of computing and from concepts and problems arising in computer science.

This volume contains the proceedings of the AMS Short Course on Computational Complexity Theory, held at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in Atlanta in January 1988. The purpose of the short course was to provide an overview of complexity theory and to describe some of the current developments in the field. The papers presented here represent contributions by some of the top experts in this burgeoning area of research.

Readership

Table of Contents

  • J. Hartmanis -- Overview of computational complexity theory
  • S. R. Mahaney -- The isomorphism conjecture and sparse sets
  • R. V. Book -- Restricted relativizations of complexity classes
  • N. Immerman -- Descriptive and computational complexity
  • A. L. Selman -- Complexity issues in cryptography
  • S. Goldwasser -- Interactive proof systems
Powered by MathJax

  AMS Home | Comments: webmaster@ams.org
© Copyright 2014, American Mathematical Society
Privacy Statement

AMS Social

AMS and Social Media LinkedIn Facebook Podcasts Twitter YouTube RSS Feeds Blogs Wikipedia