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Differential Equations from the Algebraic Standpoint
Joseph Fels Ritt
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Colloquium Publications
1932; 172 pp; softcover
Volume: 14
ISBN-10: 0-8218-4605-1
ISBN-13: 978-0-8218-4605-6
List Price: US$42
Member Price: US$33.60
Order Code: COLL/14
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This book can be viewed as a first attempt to systematically develop an algebraic theory of nonlinear differential equations, both ordinary and partial. The main goal of the author was to construct a theory of elimination, which "will reduce the existence problem for a finite or infinite system of algebraic differential equations to the application of the implicit function theorem taken with Cauchy's theorem in the ordinary case and Riquier's in the partial." In his 1934 review of the book, J. M. Thomas called it "concise, readable, original, precise, and stimulating", and his words still remain true.

A more fundamental and complete account of further developments of the algebraic approach to differential equations is given in Ritt's treatise Differential Algebra, written almost 20 years after the present work (Colloquium Publications, Vol. 33, American Mathematical Society, 1950).

Readership

Graduate students and research mathematicians interested in differential equations.

Table of Contents

  • Decomposition of a system of ordinary algebraic differential equations into irreducible systems
  • General solutions and resolvents
  • First applications of the general theory
  • Systems of algebraic equations
  • Constructive methods
  • Constitution of an irreducible manifold
  • Analogue of the Hilbert-Netto theorem. Theoretical decomposition process
  • Analogue for form quotients of Lüroth's theorem
  • Riquier's existence theorem for orthonomic systems
  • Systems of algebraic partial differential equations
  • Index
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